My first “real” photograph

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From a few years back, and then a couple of days ago… these two photographs are of West Quoddy Head Lighthouse in Lubec, Maine. When I first became seriously interested in landscape photography, I can remember making a very early morning run to see the sun come up at this location. I had viewed other photographers’ impressions of the red-and-white striped beacon, and was of course then intrigued to see it (and photograph it) for myself.

The photograph above was originally made on Fuji Velvia slide film and then scanned, and it was probably one of the first photographs of mine that I really liked. I can remember being excited to get the film processed, and when I placed the slide on the light table and looked through the loupe and saw something I liked… old school, but priceless.

The photograph below was made with my fancy, modern Canon 5D MK II DSLR, and was more of a “happened to be in the area” type shot this time around. Even though the middle of the day light was a little harsh, I enjoyed reminiscing about my previous visit to this location and my journey over the past few years making landscape photographs.

Different conditions for sure, but I still marveled at what is an incredibly striking landmark, and I couldn’t help but appreciate how very lucky I am to live in a state as beautiful as Maine.

The Easternmost point in the United States

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West Quoddy Head is a little spit of land near Lubec, Maine, that just happens to be the easternmost point in the United States. It is also home to one of the most striking lighthouses to be found along the coast of Maine. Built in 1858, the impressive red and white striped beacon stands guard over the Quoddy Narrows which stretch between the US and Canada, and it also sits on the piece of US soil closest to Europe. Not only do you get an amazing view of the downeast Maine rocky shoreline, but off in the distance you also get a glimpse of Grand Manan, the largest island in the Bay of Fundy. There were some pretty wildflowers growing in the immediate vicinity of the lighthouse, and those red-and-white stripes were quite remarkable.

Lighthouses of Maine

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Stumbling over the image of Marshall Point Light (I think that’s what it is called) from my previous post got me thinking about photographs I have made of other Maine lighthouses such as the one of Portland Head Light above. This also brought back vivid memories of the bone-chilling cold temperatures and icy wind from when I made this image late one January afternoon.

Anyway,  I went back into the archives and did some digging around to see what I could find on lighthouses, and the selection posted below is a small sampling. Most of the images seen here are from a few years ago when I was still shooting slide film, which gives me incentive to re-visit some of these places to see what I can do digitally. Pemaquid, West Quoddy, Portland Head, Rockland Breakwater, and Bass Harbor are just a few of the classic and iconic lighthouses standing guard along the Maine coast, with many more to be explored. Hmmm… perhaps this could be my project for the next few winter months?