Sargent Mountain and Penobscot Mountain

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Jordan Pond Trail

Jordan Pond Trail

Sam’s home from college for the summer, and needless to say, everyone around here is happy about that. He has a summer job as an intern for one of the Maine US Senators, so we are all looking forward to having him around. Before he starts work though, he and I tackled one of our favorite Acadia hikes… Sargent and Penobscot Mountains.

Jordan Pond

Jordan Pond

Sargent Mountain is 1,373 ft tall, and depending on the route you take to the top, part of the climb can be quite a scramble. We started out on the trail that hugs the shore of Jordan Pond, much of which consists of a man-made boardwalk. The mile or so we walked on this part of the hike was refreshingly cool, and we enjoyed the intermittent peeks of the water and the Bubbles at the end of the pond. The Deer Brook Trail took us to the East Cliffs Trail, and from there we rather quickly scrambled to the top of Sargent Mountain – Sam quicker than me obviously.

Jordan Pond Trail

Rocky part of the Jordan Pond Trail

East Cliffs Trail, Sargent Mountain

East Cliffs Trail, Sargent Mountain

The last time we did this hike we were socked in with dense and damp fog, so it was nice on this occasion to be able to enjoy the traditional and spectacular Acadia mountain 360 degree views. We enjoyed lunch at the Sargent Mountain Pond, and we then climbed back up to the summit of Penobscot Mountain (1,193 ft), before beginning the long slow descent along the south-facing ridge. The views were amazing, and it was GREAT to be back on the mountains of Acadia.

Sargent Mountain

Sargent Mountain

Sargent Mountain summit

Sargent Mountain summit

Glacial erratic, Penobscot Mountain

Glacial erratic, Penobscot Mountain

Penobscot Mtn views of Jordan Pond and the Atlantic Ocean

Penobscot Mtn views of Jordan Pond and the Atlantic Ocean

Sam navigating the steep part of the Spring Trail

Sam navigating the steep part of the Spring Trail

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19 thoughts on “Sargent Mountain and Penobscot Mountain

  1. VERY nice shots, I like the second the best. Loved my brief visit to Acadia, which was waaay back in 1984. Time for another visit. πŸ™‚

    • David Patterson

      Thanks Bob. I first visited Acadia back in 1988 on my honeymoon. Knew even back then that I wanted to be able to spend some time here. Definitely time for you to come back πŸ™‚

    • David Patterson

      Thanks Bill. Me too on the younger part πŸ™‚

      This is a hike that certainly had me huffing and puffing both going up, and coming down. Well worth the effort though as I was able to stroll on top of the world.

    • David Patterson

      Once you get up onto either Penobscot or Sargent it’s an easy stroll along the ridge, but both ways we took to get up and down were fairly strenuous. Maybe by going the same way we did along Jordan Pond and then up the Deer Brook Trail… I think there’s a way to avoid the East Cliffs Trail… that might make it a little bit longer, but definitely easier to the top of Sargent. It might involve a little repetition as you go back down Sargent toward Penobscot, but probably would make the hike more leisurely.

  2. When I see these pictures I whish I was already in Switserland were I can explore my new lens (17-40) and hopefully make some great landscapephotographs of the greatest glacier of Europe (Aletschglacier).

    grz. M

    • David Patterson

      Mark… congratulations on the new lens! I’m sure you will enjoy it, and I will look forward to seeing the results πŸ™‚

  3. We just hiked up to Penobscot on the Jordan Cliffs Trail. I really enjoy your photographs. I am picking my daughter up from college in Hanover, NH tomorrow and a hike together is on the agenda before we return home to NYC. I know I won’t be able to keep up with her either, but it is a truly joyful activity. To you and Sam!

    • David Patterson

      Thanks Lynn. There’s nothing quite like being out on one of the long ridges in Acadia. Have a great hike.

  4. I love seeing pine trees. Not the ones we have here, tall and lanky and looking like they’ll fall at any given moment (though they’re awful sturdy during hurricanes!). A real, true pine tree from up north. I miss those…these are lovely photos.

    • David Patterson

      Thanks Dena. We certainly have our fair share here in what is dubbed “The Pine Tree State” πŸ™‚

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